Harvard Family Research Project

Data Hub for Youth Program Evaluation

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Harvard Family Research Project (HFRP)

The HFRP maintains a database at www.hfrp.org of more than 100 out-of-school time (OST) programs in the United States detailing the strategies and instruments used to evaluate programs and participant progress. The overall goal of this project is to help build more effective youth programs. Using the HFRP profiles, the Community Alliance for Youth has located all the “free” assessment tools available online and grouped them using the OST Snapshot categories:

 

Categories of Measurement
The tools are sorted by the following categories and subcategories:

1. Academics

  • 1.1 Academic Achievement
  • 1.2 Academic/Educational Attitudes and Values

2. Psychological/Social Development

  • 2.1 Future Orientation/Future Plans
  • 2.2 Life Events and Experiences
  • 2.3 Mental Health and Behavior
  • 2.4 Relationships
  • 2.5 Identity Perceptions and Self-Esteem
  • 2.6 Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug (ATOD) Use Prevention
  • 2.7 Program Quality/Program Environment
  • 2.8 Multicomponent Scales/Comprehensive Surveys

 

For information about how to submit a Youth/OST program evaluation for inclusion in the database, please contact Erin Harris at Harvard Family Research Project at erin_harris@gse.harvard.edu or 617-495-9108.

 

.
I. Academics

 

Sub-
Category
Instrument Name Instrument Description Sample Items and Item Descriptions Evaluations and Resources

1.1

Computer Use, Confidence, Attitudes, and Knowledge Questionnaire The instrument measures youth's computer use, confidence, attitudes, and knowledge.  It is organized into four sections: demographic characteristics, computer use and experience, computer attitudes and confidence, and perceived computer knowledge. Sample items in the attitudes and confidence section include “I feel comfortable working with computers” and “Boys usually do better than girls in computer courses,” and are rated on a 5-point scale from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree). Computer Use, Confidence, Attitudes, and Knowledge Questionnaire
Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS): Letter Naming Fluency This standardized test provides a measure of risk for students' difficulties in achieving early literacy benchmark goals. Students are presented with a page of upper- and lower-case letters arranged in a random order and are asked to name as many letters as they can in one minute.

DIBELS Kindergarten Assessment

DIBELS 1st Grade Assessment

See the Website For Additional Information

Mock Report Card: Academic Grades This measure standardizes information about students' academic performance across districts that use different grading systems.  The scale is completed by teachers and measeures performance in reading and oral/written language, math, science, and social studies. Teachers rate students’ performance in school subjects using a scale from 1 (failing) to 5 (excellent).

Mock Report Card Research Form

Mock Report Card Research

Puzzle Tanks Test This test measures whether problem-solving skills learned in game-based settings carry over into problem-solving skills more generally. Youth are shown a diagram consisting of one unlimited supply tank, two tanks of set sizes that can be filled from the unlimited tank or from the set size other tank, and a truck at the bottom. Youth are asked to measure some amount of “Wonder Juice” into the truck below. The required amount does not match the size of the limited tanks, so the youth must pour between the tanks to fill the truck.

The Puzzle Tanks Test

Instructions for the Puzzle Tanks Test

Directions for Administering and Scoring the Test

Students as Agents of Change This instrument measures youth's perceived computer skills and use through 39 closed-ended and 5 open-ended items. Youth rate statements such as “I am good at using the computer to do presentations for school” on a 4-point scale ranging from 1 (never/rarely true) to 4 (almost always true).  Youth self-assess skills including “operation of a zip drive” and “create a table” on a 5-point scale ranging from 1 (I don’t know what this means) to 5 (I can teach someone how to do this. I am an expert.). Available for Free at: oerl.sri.com
Word Problem Comprehension Test (WPCT) This 12-item test measures students' comprehension of arithmetic word problems.

The following is a sample question from the test:

Which numbers are needed to do this problem?: A package of 3 toys costs 88 cents. Richie bought 2 packages. How many toys did he buy?

a. 3, 88, 2
b. 3, 88
c. 88, 2
d. 3, 2
The WPCT

Instructions for the WPCT

An Explanation of the WPCT

Directions for Administering and Scoring the WPCT

1.2 Children's Attitude to Computer Questionnaire This 11-item tool measures primary school-aged children's attitudes toward computers using three subscales: usefulness, fun, and ease of use. Children rate statements such as “I like using computers in my free time” and “It is hard to learn how to use a computer,” on a 5-point scale from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree). Children's Attitude to Computer Questionnaire
Elementary Reading Attitude Survey This assessment measures youth's recreational reading and academic reading attitudes. Questions include “How do you feel about reading in class?” and “How do you feel about reading for fun at home?” Youth respond using a 4-point Likert scale with pictorial anchors of Garfield showing various emotions. Elementary Reading Attitude Survey
Harter Self-Perception Profile for Children/Adolescents This scale measures youth's perceived competence in academics and other areas (e.g., athletics), and their general sense of self-worth.  It is intended for children over age 8, and has also been adapted specifically for adolescents. Youth read two statements and choose the description that is more like them; for example, youth are asked to choose either “Some kids often forget what they learn” or “Other kids can remember things easily.” Youth then choose whether the description is really true or sort of true of themselves. Harter Self-Perception Profile for Children/ Adolescents
Student Survey for Girls in Science and Technology This 48-item instrument measures girls' attitudes and beliefs about scientists and scientific careers Girls indicate their belief in statements such as “When I think about a scientist, I think of a person who sits in a laboratory all day” and “Scientists are good for society because they help find cures,” using a 6-point scale ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Student Survey for Girls in Science and Technology

 

II. Psychological/Social Development

Sub-
Category
Instrument Name Instrument Description Sample Items and Item Descriptions Evaluations and Resources
2.1 Career Maturity Inventory  This inventory measures youth's attitudes and competence about work and making future career decisions.  Youth report their if they agree/disagree with statements such as “you should choose an occupation that gives you a chance to help others” and “I plan to follow the line of work my parents suggest.” Career Maturity Inventory
Possible Selves (Future Orientation)  This measure consists of open-ended probes related to how youth see themselves at certain points in the future.  Youth are asked to list three hoped-for, expected, and feared future “selves” in response to the following prompts:

Hoped-for selves: “Many people have in mind some things they want to be like in the future regardless of how likely it is that they will actually be that way or do those things. These are the kinds of selves that you would hope to be like. Please list below three possible selves that you most hope to describe you in the next year.”

Expected selves: “Please list below three possible selves that are most likely to be true of you in the next year.”

Feared selves: “Please list below three possible selves that you most fear or worry about being in the next year.”For each picture of an activity (e.g. sports, outdoor play, chores, homework, TV, etc.), girls check off whether they had engaged in it yesterday, the duration of the activity, whether they “usually” engage in it, and the frequency of engagement.
Possible Selves

2.2 GEMS Activity Questionnaire  This instrument evaluates African American girls' typical daily activites.  It includes a checklist of 28 activites, along with pictures of these activities.  For each picture of an activity (e.g. sports, outdoor play, chores, homework, TV, etc.), girls check off whether they had engaged in it yesterday, the duration of the activity, whether they “usually” engage in it, and the frequency of engagement.

GEMS Activity Questionnaire

GEMS Activity Questionnaire Research

Life Events Checklist  This checklist measures stressful life events.  It consists of 46 life event items, with space for additional listings and ratings of life events.  It measures both positive and negative life events over the past 12 months. Of note, the experience of stressful life events has been associated with poorer outcomes in a variety of domains (e.g., mental and physical health, academic achievement) across the lifespan.  Events include “I got a bad mark on a test,” “I got sent to the principal,” and “Someone threatened me.” Teens answer yes or no as to whether or not each event listed occurred in their lives. Life Events Checklist
2.3 Aggression, Mood, and Learning Disabilities (AML)  This scale is a quick screening device for the early identification of school maladaption and is used by teachers to rate the frequency of ocurrence of each of 11 behaviors.  Teachers rate youth behaviors of fighting, classroom disruption, restlessness, unhappiness, impulsivity, sickness, moodiness, and difficulties with learning, on a 5-point scale ranging from seldom or never to all of the time. The AML Behavior Rating Scale
Child Adjustment Scale  This parent-completed scale includes 35 items measuring a child's socio-emotional adjustment, which includes scales of work habits, peer relations, and compliance.  Parents rate youth on items include “listens when others are talking,” “takes turns,” “hits other kids,” and “wants to do well in school” using a 4-point scale from 1 (hardly ever) to 4 (almost always). Child Adjustment Scale
Child Behavior Scale  This teacher-reported scale measures students' aggressive, withdrawn, and prosocial behaviors.  Teachers rate such items as, “compromises in conflict with classmates,” and “annoys or irritates classmates,” using a 3-point scale: 0 (not true), 1 (sometime true), and 2 (often true).

Child Behavior Scale Sample Items

Child Behavior Scale Research

Hopelessness Scale for Children  This 17-item scale measures dimensions of hopelessness and helplessness.  Youth report whether statements such as “All I can see ahead of me are bad things, not good things,” and “Things just won’t work out the way I want them to” are true or untrue. Hopelessness Scale for Children
Mental Health Inventory  This scale measures youth's self-reported moods and emotional states.  The inventory assesses psychological distress and well-being through five lower-order factors-anxiety, depression, emotional ties, general positive affect, and loss of behavioral/emotional control.  Youth respond to questions such as “How much of the time, during the past month, have you felt downhearted and blue?” and “How much of the time, during the past month, have you felt calm and peaceful?”

Mental Health Inventory

Mental Health Inventory Research

Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Instrument  This 40-item instrument measures the degree to which children connect their actions to the outcomes that result from them (internal vs. external control).  Youth answer yes or no to questions such as “Do you believe that most problems will solve themselves if you just don’t fool around with them?” and “Do you believe that wishing can make good things happen?” N/A
2.4 Interpersonal Competence Scale (ICS) This instrument completed by teachers is a set of rating scales to measure social competence by using items related to aggression and popularity. Teachers rate youth on items such as “gets into trouble,” “gets into fights,” “argues,” “popular with boys/girls,” and “has lots of friends,” using a scale of 1 (very much untrue of the child) to 5 (very much true of the child). Interpersonal Competence Scale (ICS)
Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment This scale measures various qualities of youth's relationships with parents and peers, such as trust, quality of communication, and feelings of anger and alienation. Youth report the frequency with which statements such as “I trust my parents,” or “My friends accept me as I am” are true. Responses range from almost always or always true, to almost never or never true. Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment
Parent-Teacher Involvement Questionnaire (PTI) This 26-item measure assesses facets of parent-teacher involvement.  Subscales include frequency of contact between parents and teachers, and assessments of the frequency with which parents engage in various activities. Sample items include true/false questions such as, “In the past year, you stopped by your child’s school to talk to his/her teacher,” and rating activities such as reading to children, taking them to the library, and volunteering at school. The items are scored on 5-point scales from 0 (no involvement) to 4 (high involvement). Parent and Teacher Involvement Questionnaire
Perceived Social Support Scale-Revised This scale's 30-items measure youth's perceived social support from family, school personnel, and peers. Youth respond to statements such as “School personnel/ community center staff are good at helping me solve problems,” and “My friends are sensitive to my personal needs.” Perceived Social Support Scale Research
Prosocial Behavior Scale This measure is completed by teachers to assess students' social skills with peers. Teachers rate youth on items that include “accurately interprets what peers are trying to do” and “is aware of the effects of his/her behavior on others,” using a scale from 1 (very poor) to 5 (very good). Prosocial Behavior Scale
Sibling Relationship Questionnaire This questionnaire includes 15 scales with 3 items each measuring youth's perceived relationships with siblings (e.g., admiration, dominance, parent partiality, etc.). Youth respond to questions such as “How much do you and your sibling both share with each other?” on scales ranging from hardly at all to [sic] extremely much.

Sibling Relationship Research

Sibling Relationship Research, continued

2.5 Body Satisfaction A measure adapted from youth's reactions to eight body sizes that measure the degree of discrepancy between youth's perceptions of how they look and how they would like to look. Youth are presented with eight body figure drawings and asked to first choose the body type they believe resembles themselves. Youth then pick the figure that looks the way they would like to look.


N/A

Children's OMNI Scale of Perceived Exertion This scale uses picture scales to enable exercisers to rate their physical exertion visually. Items are pictorial depictions of exertion on a 0 to 10 scale, with 10 being maximum possible exertion. N/A
Feelings of Inadequacy Scale-Revised This scale consists of 36 self-reported items measuring five factors: self-regard, social confidence, school abilities, physical appearance, and physical abilities. Youth are presented with statements such as “I feel as smart as others” or “I feel self-conscious” and then report the frequency (practically never to very often) with which they feel in that way. N/A
Harter Self-Perception Profile for Children/Adolescents This scale measures youth's perceived competence in academics and other areas (e.g., athletics), and their general sense of self-worth.  It is intended for children over age 8, and has also been adapted specifically for adolescents. Youth read two statements and choose the description that is more like them; for example, youth are asked to choose either “Some kids often forget what they learn” or “Other kids can remember things easily.” Youth then choose whether the description is really true or sort of true of themselves. Harter Self-Perception Profile for Children/ Adolescents
McKnight Risk Factor Survey This Survey assesses risk and protective factors in adolescent girls for the development of eating disorders. Youth respond to verious questions about weight gain, diet, eating habits, body appearance, parents' diet, coping skills, support, and more. Available for Free at bml.stanford.edu
Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale-2nd Edition This 60-item self-reported scale assesses general self-esteem in chidren aged 7-18, and has six subscales: behavior, intellectual and school status, physical appearance and attributes, anxiety, popularity, and happiness and satisfaction. Test items are simple descriptive statements, written at a second grade reading level. Youth indicate whether each item applies to them by selecting a yes or no response. (A Spanish Test Booklet is available for children who read Spanish only.) Available for Purchase at www.mhs.com
Revised Cultural Awareness Test (RCAT) The scales, designed to measure ethnic identity or cross-cultural awareness, contain illustrations of dress, sports, food, and symbols from various cultures. Youth rate their reactions toward each illustration by selecting one of five faces ranging from happy to sad. Available in
P.A. Zirkel's Cultural Attitudes Scales: Puerto Rican, Black-American, and Anglo-American
Self-Description Questionnaire III This 76-itemself-report inventory for youth aged 8-12 measures self-concept in the following areas: mathematics, reading, general-school, physical abilities, physical appearance, peer relations, parent relations, total academic, total nonacademic, total self, and general self.  There are also similar inventories designed for older youth. Youth are asked to read declarative sentences (e.g., “I’m good at mathematics,” and “I make friends easily”) and to select one of eight responses ranging from definitely false to definitely true. Available for Free at www.self.ox.ac.uk
Self-Liking and Self-Competence Scale-Revised This 18-item scale measures perceived personal efficacies and self-esteem. Sample items include “I perform very well at many things” and “I do not have enough respect for myself.” The items are scored on a 5-point scale from strongly disagree to strongly agree. Available for Free at psych.utoronto.ca
Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanics-Youth Version (SASH-Y) This 12-item measure assesses the predominant language used in different contexts of a child's day (reading, speaking, thinking, and television/radio) and the predominant ethnicity of a child's social group (close friends and visitors). Youth rate the language used in various contexts on a 5-point scale with 1 indicating only Spanish, 3 indicating both Spanish and English equally, and 5 indicating only English. Available for Free Online
2.6  Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) National Youth Survey  This survey measures alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use and associated risk and resiliency factors for youth aged 9-18.  It is adapted from a number of instruments measuring outcomes typical of substance use prevention programs. Youth answer questions such as “On how many days in the last month (30 days) did you smoke a cigarette?” and “Pretend your best friend offered you some marijuana and you did not want it. How hard would it be to say ‘no’?” Available for Free at www.emt.org
Communities that Care Survey This survey for youth in Grades 6-12 measures the incidence and prevalence of substance use, delinquency, and related problem behaviors and the risk and protective factors that predict those problems in communities. Questions are organized into the following categories: general demographics; alcohol, tobacco, and other drug incidence and prevalence; and specific risk and protective factors in the domains of community, family, school, and peer–individual. Available for Free at store.samhsa.gov
2.7  After-School Activity Observation Instrument (AOI)  This tool is used during site visits to collect observational data measuring the quality of interactions, opportunities, and resources The observer records indicator data during 5-minute observations. Indicators include youth interactions, staff–youth interactions, youth engagement, opportunities for skill-building and mastery, activity organization, and setting and resources. Available for Free at childcare.wceruw.org
After-School Environment Scale This 36-item scale measures three main components of the afterschool program environment, as reported by youth: enthusiasm for and perceptions of emotional support, beliefs regarding opportunities for autonomy and privacy, and opportunities for peer affiliations. Youth report the frequency (on a scale ranging from never to always) with which they experience things in their afterschool program like “I get to know other kids well here” and “I help plan what we do here.” Available for Free at childcare.wceruw.org
After-School Quality (ASQ) This 36-item scale measures three main components of the afterschool program environment, as reported by youth: enthusiasm for and perceptions of emotional support, beliefs regarding opportunities for autonomy and privacy, and opportunities for peer affiliations. N/A Available for Purchase at www.niost.org
National After-School Association (NSACA) Standards for Quality School-Age Care This assessment contains program quality standards for human relationships, indoor environment, outdoor environment, activites, safety, health, nutrition, and administration. Program observers assess the degree to which the program meets various quality standards, such as “Staff make children feel welcome and comfortable,” “There are regular opportunities for creative arts and dramatic play,” and “Staff have access to adequate and convenient storage.” Responses range on a scale from 0 (no evidence or not met) to 3 (fully met). Available for Purchase at www.naaweb,org
Out-of-School Time Observation Instrument-2nd edition This observation tool rates project activites on five key domains related to youth development: youth-directed relationship building, youth participation, staff-directed relationship building, staff strategies for skill building and mastery, and activity content and structure. Sample items include “Youth are friendly to each other,” “Youth are on-task,” “Staff use positive behavior management techniques,” “Staff communicate goals, purposes, and expectations,” and “The activity is well organized.” Each indicator is rated on a scale from 1 (not evident) to 7 (highly evident and consistent). Available for Free at www.sedl.org
Promising Practices Rating System This program observation tool is designed to quantify seven program processes related to quality, including supportive relations with adults, supportive relations with peers, youth engagement, appropriate program structure, cognitive growth opportunities, mastery orientation, and autonomy opportunities. Sample items include “Staff listen attentively and look at children when they are speaking,” “Children appear relaxed and involved with each other,” and “Students contribute to discussions.” Items are rated on a 4-point scale from 1 (highly uncharacteristic) to 4 (highly characteristic). Available for Free at childcare.wcerew.org
Quality Assurance System (QAS) This quality assessment tool examines the following program elements: program space, health and safety, program materials and supplies, program structure, staff development, staff responsibilities, involvement and interaction, parent responsibilities, involvement and interaction, district staff and community partnership, involvement and interaction, and program content. Ratings of program elements are based on a 4-point scale from 1 (unsatisfactory) to 4 (outstanding). Available for Purchase at gas.foundationsinc.org
Quality of School Age Child Care Checklist This 38-item tool measures perceptions of afterschool prograsms.  It is comprised of five subscales: facilities and furnishings, guidance and supervision, programming and activities, parent, school and community relationships, and staffing and staff characteristics. Sample statements include “Staff consistently encourage/reward appropriate behavior; use positive behavior management techniques” and “Opportunities, resources and support are provided to assist children with homework.” Statements are rated on a 7-point scale ranging from 1 (inadequate) to 7 (excellent). Available for Free at health.oregonstate.edu
School-Age Care Environment Rating Scale (SACERS)

This observation scale measures a program's developmental appropriateness, focusing on 43 items from six subscales: space and furnishings, health and safety, activities, interactions, program structure, and staff development.

There is also a 7th subscale of six items for programs that include children with special needs.

Example items include “space for gross motor activities” and “staff–child interactions.” Each item is rated on a 7-point scale from 1 (inadequate) to 7 (excellent). An average score on the 43 items is then calculated.

Available for Purchase at
store.tcpress.com

Sense of School as a Community Scale Separate scales for elementary and middle school youth measure perceptions of experiencing a supportive community in a program, such as whether people care about each other in the program and whether people treat each other with respect in the program. Youth report their agreement with statements such as “Students in my class don’t really care about each other” and “Teachers and students treat each other with respect in this school.” Available for Free at www.devstu.org
2.8 Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale-2nd edition This scale includes approximately 50 items that measure the personal strengths and competencies of youth aged 5-18 from three perspectives: child, parent, and teacher/other professional.  It assesses several aspects of these strengths and competencies: interpersonal strength, involvement with family, intrapersonal strength, school functioning, affective strength, and career strength.  Adults rate items in a number of areas such as “accepts responsibility for own actions,” “talks about the positive aspects of life,” and “shows concern for the feelings of others” on a 4-point scale from 0 (not at all like the child) to 3 (very much like the child). Available for Purchase at www.proedinc.com
Individual Protective Factors Index This 71-item self-administered questionnaire measures the resiliancy of adolescents (aged 10-16).  It assesses 10 attitudinal orientations in three major domains: social bonding, personal competence, and social competence Youth respond to statements such as “I get mad easily,” “Drinking alcohol is bad for your health,” and “Following the rules is stupid” using a 4-point scale (YES!, yes, no, NO!). Available for Free at www.emt.org
Intake Questionnaire for Entering 9th Grades This assessment measures youth's social supports, interest in specific careers, attitude toward scientists and scientific careers, self-assessment of intelligence compared to peers, and ecucational experiences and aspirations.  Youth also report information about the educational attainment and careers of members of their households.

Examples of attitude toward scientific careers include “It is more difficult for women to get ahead in math and science careers than for men” and “Careers in math and science offer high salaries.” These items are rated on a 5-point scale ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree.

Examples of social supports items include asking youth to state the number of “female friends who are interested in mathematics, science, or computers” on a 5-point scale ranging from none to four or more.

Available for Free at oerl.sri.com
Llife Skills Development Evaluation This tool measures youth's life skills in eight categories: decision making, wise use of resources, communication, accepting differences, leadership, marketable skills, healthy lifestyle choices, and self-responsibility. Sample items include “I listen carefully to what others say” and “I list my options before making a decision.” Items are rated on a 4-point scale: 1 (no), 2 (sometimes), 3 (usually), 4 (yes). Available for Free at ext.wsu.edu
Public/Private Ventures San Fransisco Beacons Youth Survey This survey is comprised primarily of various positive youh devlopment indicators, such as self-efficacy, positive reactions to challenges, meaningful roles and responsibilities, etc. Sample items include: “I don’t try very hard in school,” “If I can’t do a job the first time, I keep trying until I can,” and “I handle unexpected problems very well,” rated on a 4-point scale from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Youth are also asked to report specific numbers in response to questions about their roles/responsibilities and relationships with adults and peers. N/A
Social Skills Improvement System Rating Scales These questionnaires for youth aged 3-18, as well as their parents and teachers, each assess one of the following scales: social skills, problem behaviors, and academic competence. Respondents report the frequency with which youth demonstrate qualities such as “feels sorry for others,” “disagrees without fighting,” and “is aggressive toward people or objects." Available for purchase at
psychcorp.pearsonass
essments.com
Survey of Afterschool Youth Outcomes (SAYO) This survey for afterschool staff and teachers measures outcomes in eight areas that research suggests are linked to long-term positive development and academic/life success: academic performance, homework completion and effort, classroom behavior, initiative, engagement in learning, analysis and problem solving skills, communication skills, and relations with adults and peers. Sample teacher items include, “volunteers to ask a question or answer a question in class” and “sets goals for self.” Sample staff items include “initiates interactions with adults” and “shows consideration for peers.”  Teachers and staff report the frequency of items using a 5-point scale ranging from 1 (never) to 5 (always). Available for Purchase at www.niost.org
The After-School Corporation (TASC) Elementary, Middle, and High School Student Surveys These three surveys-one each for elementary, middle, and high school students-ask youth about their experiences and needs with regard to the afterschool program. Each survey contains questions about youth’s background characteristics, time use, academic self-concept and attitudes, perceptions and opinions about the program, feelings about peers in the program, and perceptions of positive effects of program participation. The middle and high school surveys also measure leadership opportunities and social supports in the program, as well as prosocial and antisocial behavior. In addition, the high school survey measures youth’s delinquency-related and sexual activity-related behavior, as well as their college and post-secondary future plans. Available for Free at www.polystudies.com
The After-School Corporation (TASC) Parent Survey This survey is administered to parents of afterschool program participants to learn more about their experiences and needs in relation to the program. Questions address parents’ background characteristics, youth’s time use prior to participating in the program, parents’ perceptions of and satisfaction with the program, and their perceptions of youth and family outcomes associated with program participation. Available for Free at www.polystudies.com
The After-School Corporation (TASC) Principal Survey This survey is administered to principals to learn about the quality an availability of afterschool services, the relationship between the afterschool program and the school, and the costs and benefits to the school of hosting the program. Questions address principals’ perceptions of the program, its strengths and weaknesses, its relationship with the school and school-day teachers, and its effectiveness in benefiting youth. Available for Free at www.polystudies.com
The After-School Corporation (TASC) Site Coordinator Survey This survey is administered to site coordinators and is designed to capture basic information about the afterschool program and the site coordinator's experience with the program. Questions address program goals, enrollment, activities/schedule, youth/staff interactions, staffing, supervision, and support; relationship with school; parent/ community outreach/involvement; and site coordinator background/experience. Available for Free at www.polystudies.com
The After-School Corporation (TASC) Staff Survey This survey is administered to program staff to gather information aout the program's goals, activites, and services: staffing patterns, partnership with participating schools, and professional development opportunities. Questions address job characteristics (including perceptions of youth and programming); job satisfaction, supervision, and support; training/technical assistance opportunities; relationship with school; and background/ experience. Available for Free at www.polystudies.com
What About You? This survey is used for needs assessment and to evaluate programs to prevent alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use and other forms of adolescent problem behavior, and to increase school safety. Questions address youth’s attachment to school, rebellious and delinquent behavior, drug use, attitudes about drug use, peer relationships, parental supervision, commitment to education, belief in rules, social skills, attachment to prosocial adults, unsupervised afterschool time, and involvement in constructive activities. Available for Purchase at www.gottfredson.com